QubePAK 3

Outdoor LED Wall Pack

®

The QubePAK®3 is an energy-efficient LED alternative for existing lighting technology like metal halide. This LED wall pack offers quality illumination in a popular, classic appearance. Perfect for any commercial exterior application, it keeps a traditional shape that easily maintains architectural aesthetics. The QubePAK®3 is ideal for new construction or retrofit projects that need ultra-long lifetime operation.

  • Low-wattage, highly efficient patented LED replacement for legacy lighting technology

  • Robust die-cast aluminum housing protects integral components from harsh environments and optimizes thermal management

  • Suitable for wet locations

Resources / Downloads

What is Solar Energy Purchase (SEP) product?


A Solar Energy Purchase or ‘SEP’ is an arrangement to sell energy to a customer using solar panels owned by a third-party Investor/Owner. TNB is a contracting and billing entity, and the customer acts as the ‘host site’ that consumes power (also export to the grid if there is surplus). This arrangement is via a tripartite agreement called Supply Agreement with Renewable Energy (SARE) between Investor/Owner, TNB (with TNBX as its billing agent) and the customer. The customer can either choose a PPA (Power Purchase Agreement) or Fixed Lease arrangement, either to be billed on their utility bill (TNB bill).




How is SEP structured?


A Solar Energy Purchase or ‘SEP’ is an arrangement to sell energy to a customer using solar panels owned by a third-party Investor/Owner. TNB is a contracting and billing entity, and the customer acts as the ‘host site’ that consumes power (also export to the grid if there is surplus). This arrangement is via a tripartite agreement called Supply Agreement with Renewable Energy (SARE) between Investor/Owner, TNB (with TNBX as its billing agent) and the customer. The customer can either choose a PPA (Power Purchase Agreement) or Fixed Lease arrangement, either to be billed on their utility bill (TNB bill).




What is Supply Agreement with Renewable Energy (SARE) agreement?


A Supply Agreement with Renewable Energy (SARE) is a tripartite agreement between by a third-party Investor/Owner, TNB (TNBX as its billing agent) and the customer. The agreement details out the contract years, the solar sen/kWh price, the covenants and obligations of each party as listed above. TNB acts as only the contracting and billing agent in this contract. The SARE arrangement is endorsed by the Energy Commission (ST) of Malaysia and Sustainable Energy Development Authority (SEDA), and recently announced by the MESTECC Minister.




What are the benefits for a customer?


The customer essentially has little risk as they are merely buying energy from the Investor/Owner at a rate less than what they would normally pay TNB. In addition, the customer is not generally responsible for maintenance (other than ensuring that there are no damages caused by them and no shading effect from nearby structures). Essentially the customer now has a second electricity supplier at a lower rate and with not exposed to possible future rate increase (along with other added taxes like KWTBB and ICPT charges), while contributing to their sustainability objectives.




What are the disadvantages for a customer?


Since the Investor/Owner of the PV system is bearing both credit and operating risks, they typically look for a certain minimum percentage return rate of return (after tax) on their invested capital. This usually means that the customer will be paying for power for a longer duration (eg 15 and up to 25 years) before the solar PV system is handed over to them. Under a customer own financing arrangement, usually the PV system’s payback period is 7 to 10 years so the customer gets a much longer period of ‘free energy’ but they are now responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of the solar system.




Are there any tax benefits and other incentives?


Typically the owner of the solar system always receives the tax benefits and usually retains any rebates or performance based incentives as well including carbon credits. These form part of the yield equation in determining the SEP sen/kWh price offer to the customer. The customer now is not required to pay added taxes like KWTBB and ICPT charges for the kWh consumed from the solar system.




When is the SEP economically feasible?


Investor/Owner of SEP looks for an acceptable yield, and in addition to the credit and system performance risks, they bear the operating and maintenance expenses. Like all investments, yields are based on the total investment, the cash flows and any tax benefits and incentives received from the authorities.
The yields for a particular project is usually based on:-
1. Total cost for the project
2. Annual energy production in kWh
3. Revenue from selling this energy via with or without NEMs
4. Annual increase (if any) in the buy rate per kWh
5. Length of the SARE contract in years
6. Purchase option(s) at the end of the SARE
7. Tax benefits as well as any other government incentives
8. Panel degradation, maintenance and component replacement cost




What other decision criteria are used by the Investor/Owner?


Credit is most important, as you can only sell the energy from a system if the customer is still in business and will buy it from you. Most Investor/Owner will be looking for very strong credits ratings as well as EPCs who they can rely upon to perform maintenance for the contracted 15 years or longer




What is the size for a SEP to be considered?


The optimum size of the solar panel will be determined after the asset/owner studies a customer’s consumption profile, the size of the rooftop available for installation of the panels and surplus energy that exports to the grid. Other information required are the irradiance potential and any shading effect of the location to estimate the production capacity of the solar panel thus determining the estimated savings on the customer’s electricity bill.




How do I as an investor/asset owner proceed for a SARE contract?


Investor/Asset Owner should do the initial feasibility study and propose to the customer. Once an LOI is received from the customer, the investor /owner needs to decide the billing mechanism to collect their monthly payments. SARE contracting offer investor/owner a mechanism to address this challenge. SARE contract must be obtained from TNBX, after registration with SEDA.




Does TNB offer a Solar Energy Product?


Yes, TNB via its wholly own subsidiary, GSPARX , also offers solar energy products i.e., solar outright purchase, loan-arrangement, solar-PPA and lease-type. The suitability of each individual product to the customer depends on the customer’s risk appetite and installation objectives.




Who is the Investor/Owner?


A12 – For TNB, GSPARX will be one of the investors/Owners and there could be other investors such as banks, investment funds, private parties or PV system service providers itself interested to be an Investor/Owner.




How do I, as an individual, apply for SARE?


A13 – Generally, SARE is applied by the Investor/Owner as they are the party that require TNB to assist in the billing & Invoicing, revenue management and contracting service. You can get more information on SARE via sending an email to tnbx@tnb.com.my




What is the maximum size in kW of Solar I can apply?


A14 – The limit is usually the rooftop size with a conservative estimate of 1kWp of solar panel per 10m square of rooftop area. If the customer has surplus power and wishes to apply into the NEM scheme, the maximum size depends on the CT rating for domestic customer and historical recorded Maximum Demand for the commercial and industrial customer




What happens to the surplus unit I generate?


The units generated can be exported to TNB grid for NEM credits that can offset with electricity bills. The customer must apply for a NEM (Net Energy Metering) scheme that has a quota from SEDA (Sustainable Energy Development Authority) to be able to do so. Please refer to SEDA’s website for information on NEM (www.seda.gov.my). Note that the accumulated NEM credits are limited to 24 months after which it will be zeroised




What price is Solar @ kw in the market currently


The price of solar per kWp depends on the market and it varies month to month. Currently, it ranges between RM4,500/kWp to RM6,000/kWp depending on the project size per site (usually inclusive of the inverter). This excludes the cost of maintenance of the panels and replacement of the inverter over the useful life of the solar panels.




Can the SARE contract be negotiated and/or modified?


SARE contracts are designed in such a way that the risks are borne between the asset owner/investor and the customer. TNB has a limited role of being de contracting and billing agent, and the responsibility on the solar metering. Thus, the obligations are mainly between the asset owner/investor and the customer. Any risk shifting should occur between those two and not pushed to TNB as TNB earns 1-2sen only. Customer however can propose the wordings and TNB will consider it on a case-by-case basis, subject to the conditions state before.




What is TNB’s Electricity Supply Contract?


This is the original contract that the customer signs up with TNB when they first applied for electricity supply, or they assume an existing electricity supply. It has a contract number, account number and a date when the contract was signed.




What is the difference between DC and AC capacity?


A19 – DC capacity is the power produced by the solar panels before conversion into AC by the inverter. The size being quoted by vendors are normally in DC kWp (kilowatt peak) system and can n to AC grid capacity by a certain factor lesser than 1. The closer the factor is to one, the more efficient is the solar system.




What is Minimum Energy Payment?


A20 – Minimum Energy Payment is the payment required by the Asset Owner/Investor to cover their investment. This payment usually is lower than the typical monthly bill to be paid by the customer and caters for extended period in a month when customers are not consuming. However, as of now, TNB stipulates a zero minimum energy payment.




What are the customer types that SARE can cater for?


SARE now can cater for Government offices, Sdn Bhd, Berhad, and societies. Also it can cater for tenanted premise whereby there is a consented letter allowing for the installation by the building owner for the tenant to have the solar installed at the building where the beneficiary and the bill payee is the tenant. The tenant will have the right to purchase the solar system or removed after the he has vacated.




Can SARE contract be a shorter duration than 20 years?


Yes but as expected the solar price maybe of a higher price since the investor would want to keep the return the same for any duration of the contract. However this depends on the investor risk appetite and its assessment of the customer’s default risk




Why does TNB as a party in the contract does not provide representations and warranties?


NB has a limited role of being de contracting and billing agent, and the responsibility on the solar metering. As such, the obligations are mainly between the asset owner/investor and the customer only.




What does the insurance procured by the asset owner/investor covers?


The responsibility of procuring the insurance for the solar PV system lies with the asset owner/investor. This insurance does not cover the building where the solar PV system is installed on the rooftop. The customer should check with its insurance provider if their current insurance can cover any hazards that can be caused by the solar PV installation. Normally this is already the case, or for an additional premium, the existing coverage can be extended

SARE is a post commissioning contract to insure operation, maintenance and billing for the solar system thus an all-purpose insurance is taken by GSPARX at its cost and expense, as the owner/investor of the solar system. It covers any potential liability, loss or damage as typically required by TNB, during the operation of the solar system. As for during construction phase, a project insurance will be procured by their EPC contractor and can be presented before work starts to the customer.




What happens if the rooftop structure is weak?


The asset owner/investor will assess the suitability of the rooftop during its site visit. Usually the rooftop plan is asked for. If they find the structure is not suitable for installation of the PV system, of the possibility of the water proofing layer is compromised (over the duration of the contract), they will advise the customer to repair or replace the rooftop first before installation can start.




What if the customer has an existing solar installation?


Not a problem. The asset owner/investor will not disturb the existing solar installation as it may be tied to previous schemes such as self-generation, FiT or LSS. The new installation should have be connected to the distribution board to supply the internal load.




Can the customer vacate or sell the premise before the end of the contract?


The customer can novate the SARE contract to the new owner, or they can purchase the solar PV system as per the yearly buy-out table as prepared by the investor/owner in Appendix E. The new owner should be convinced that the solar system contributes to energy savings and their sustainability objectives. The solar PV system should add value to the premise and lasts a long time for any owner to receive the benefits.




What if there is a new structure built nearby in the future that shades the solar PV system?


The asset owner/investor is expected to discuss this possibility with the customer, taking cognizant of any future developments in the surrounding area. If both are of the opinion that there will be a future development that can cause problems, the customer must take this risk. However, they can potentially relocate the solar PV system to another site (cost to be borne by the customer).




Is there any size limitation to the customer’s solar PV installation?


There is a rule stipulated by the Suruhanjaya Tenaga that the maximum size of the solar PV system must be at 75% of the 12 months past historical bill. Another physical limitation is the size of the rooftop itself and any encumbrances or competing use of the rooftop with solar. The asset owner/investor is expected to design optimally for the customer for the best savings.




Can the solar PV system be installed as ground-mounted system?


Yes provided that it is for self-generation and near to the internal load to minimise the cabling work. If the customer is desirous to apply for the NEM scheme, the solar PV system must be on a rooftop of a structure that has another primary use.




What happens to the solar system after the contract expires?


The solar system will be transferred to the customer. The customer will then be responsible for the operation, maintenance and upkeep of the solar system. There are many solar system vendors in the market that the customer can further engage for a separate maintenance contract.




What happens to the solar meter after the contract expires?


The solar meter will be transferred to the customer. The customer will then be responsible for the operation, maintenance and upkeep of the solar meter. If the customer wishes for the solar meter to be removed, TNB will do so at a minimum cost. However, TNB recommends that the customer keeps the solar meter as it measures the performance of the solar system.




Can the customer invest instead of GSPARX or other asset owner/investor (AO)?


Yes. The customer can be the asset owner/investor (AO) itself. However, it is expected that they make engage their own EPC contractors and all arrangements between them are the responsibility of the customer. TNB’s role here is limited to contracting and billing agent, in addition of the ownership and maintenance of the solar meter.




What is ‘transfer cost’ and what would be its amount?


‘Transfer cost’ is the amount equal to all reasonable costs and expenses of the of the asset owner/investor which are incurred or suffered as a result of the purchase of the solar system by the consumer. This is expected to include any termination payments or novation fees or any taxes, any reasonable breakage costs/fees. The amount varies according to year where the contract terminates/expires. ‘Transfer cost’ is deducted from the solar purchase price/buy-out table if the reason of the termination of contract is due to the asset owner/investor.




What is a ‘Force Majeure’ event?


A ‘Force Majeure’ event is an event, condition or circumstance which is beyond the reasonable control of and occurs without fault or negligence on the part of the customer or asset owner/investor. This event causes delay or disruption in the performance of the customer or asset owner/investor. The events included are strikes, lockouts, work stoppages, industrial actions, terrorism, public disorders, acts of God, severe weather conditions, expropriation by Government or failure to renew any Government Authorisations.




Can a customer or asset owner/investor terminates the SARE contract voluntarily?


Yes. If the customer terminates the SARE contract, they will have the option to purchase the solar PV system as per the purchase price/buy-out table in the Appendix E of the SARE contract. If the asset owner/investor terminates the SARE contract, the asset owner/investor will have the option to sell the solar PV system as per the same purchase price/buy-out table. Failure of the customer to purchase the solar PV system from the asset owner/investor may cause the latter to recourse to legal actions to recover its investments in the solar PV system.




What is a single billing system?


SARE will provide for the convenience of a single billing system whereby the solar bill will be on another line item/separate sheet to the new bill. If the customer fails to pay any part of the whole bill, the outstanding amount will be carried forward to the following month. If the customer fails to make payment to TNB for a period of 2 months, normal disconnection process applies.




What happens if the solar PV system malfunction or not producing energy as expected?


The asset owner/investor is expected to remedy the situation immediately as their returns on investment depends on the solar PV system operating correctly. They will have a remote monitoring system that checks for any reduction or unexpected degradation of the solar kWhr yield.




What if the customer is of the opinion that the solar meter is in error?


The customer can inform the asset/owner and/or TNB to inspect the solar meter. Note that if solar meter is found out to be working properly, there will be a minimum charge to the customer by TNB. Note that TNB may inspect and test the solar energy meter at its own cost and expense and provide the customer with reasonable advance written notice for inspection.




Why does TNB have the right to disconnect the supply?


TNB has the right to (temporarily) disconnect supply under clause 4.3 (because of an emergency condition or for the purpose of maintenance of the solar meter), non-compliance of the customer under clause 5 (Billing and Payment) of the SARE contract or clause 12 (Force Majeure).





713-972-9393

World Headquarters

6807 Portwest Drive

Houston TX 77024

  • White LinkedIn Icon
  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon
  • White YouTube Icon

Copyright ® 2020 US LED, Ltd. All rights reserved.